MGMadagascar

Madagascar

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MadagascarMadagascar

Solar Energy - A Warm Idea

“Now that I have a light in my reception room I can deliver babies at night,” said the midwife of a tiny coastal village in southwest Madagascar. Before she received the solar-charged electric light, she had used candles but the insufficient light led her to stop delivering after dark.  The ... read more

Andrew March

MadagascarMadagascar

Speaking Culture, More than Just A Language

Suppose I told you that I had a revolutionary idea that will allow you to write sustainably, save the planet, and save money all at the same time.  This project, very simply implemented, will replace your current setup of Word 2010.  Then I hand you a quill and inkwell.  I ... read more

Andrew March

MadagascarMadagascar

peanut butter vs. the internet in madagascar

The heat weighed heavy on my head as I walked to work this morning, dodging rickshaws and motorcycles, small filthy children and people with huge bags and baskets of things (charcoal, greens, flip flops) perched on their heads. I work in a telecenter, and my job is to teach people ... read more

Sara LeHoullier

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Getting Around

Impress people in Madagascar with a few key phrases

Maureen Maloney

19 Nov 2009

Madagascar

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Maureen Maloney

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Not many people speak Malagasy, the language of Madagascar. Even if you only know a few phrases locals will be very impressed and call you "mahay" (smart). When you see someone say "Salama!" and ask them "Ino vaovao?" (ee-no vo-vo) or "What's new?" They will respond "Tsy misy" (tsee me-see) or "Nothing." Then you will ask the same question in a different way with "Ino miresaka?" (ee-no me-ray-sa-ka), and they will again say "Tsy misy." There you go! That's really all you need to look like a genius while visiting Madagascar. Be prepared for them to laugh hysterically. It's not because you said anything wrong, it's just so unbelievable that a "vazaha" (foreigner) is speaking their language. That's a good thing.

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